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Gender Differences in Addiction

Online
1.5 CE Hour
General
Free

Presented By

Brought to You By

When and Where

Location

  • Live Webinar
    Access virtually on TPN.health
Description
This workshop will highlight the unique physiological, psychological, and sociological characteristics demonstrated by women with substance use disorders. Transgender populations have a higher rate of substance use disorders and require further research and integrative care. Diagnosis and treatment should focus on inherent gender differences. This presentation will review the risks for women and transgender individuals with substance use. We will also review the needs they have in treatment and recovery.
Target Audience
  • Counselors
  • Addiction Counselors
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
Educational Goal

The educational goal of this workshop is to increase knowledge of addiction and gender.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify four or more sex and/or gender differences that affect women's experience with substance use, SUD services, and recovery.

  • Identify three or more common reasons that women initiate substance use.

  • Identify three risk factors for initiation of substance use.

  • Identify three protective factors for women/girls.

  • Identify three consequences/risks of Substance Use and SUDs for women.

  • Identify three common barriers women encounter while seeking and accessing treatment for substance use.

References
  • Becker, J. B., McClellan, M. L., & Reed, B. G. (2017). Sex differences, gender and addiction. Journal of neuroscience research, 95(1-2), 136-147.

  • Brady, K. T., & Lydiard, J. B. (2021). Women and addiction. Textbook of Addiction Treatment: International Perspectives, 1395-1405.

  • Connolly, D. J., Davies, E., Lynskey, M., Maier, L. J., Ferris, J. A., Barratt, M. J., & Gilchrist, G. (2022). Differences in alcohol and other drug use and dependence between transgender and cisgender participants from the 2018 Global Drug Survey. LGBT health, 9(8), 534-542.

  • Cornish, J. L., & Prasad, A. A. (2021). Sex differences in substance use disorders: a neurobiological perspective. Frontiers in global women's health, 2, 778514.

  • Zakiniaeiz, Y., & Potenza, M. N. (2018). Gender-related differences in addiction: A review of human studies. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 23, 171-175.

  • Anonymous, Alcoholics Anonymous, (1939, 1955, 1976, 2001). ‘The Big Book’ 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th editions.

  • Ait-Daoud, N., Blevins, D., Khanna, S., Sharma, S., Holstege, C. P., & Amin, P. (2019). Women and addiction: an update. Medical Clinics, 103(4), 699-711.

  • Becker, J. B., McClellan, M. L., & Reed, B. G. (2017). Sex differences, gender and addiction. Journal of neuroscience research, 95(1-2), 136-147.

  • Becker, J. B. (2022). Sex differences in addiction. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience.

  • Brady, K. T., & Lydiard, J. B. (2021). Women and addiction. Textbook of Addiction Treatment: International Perspectives, 1395-1405.

  • Case, P., Bryn Austin, S., Hunter, D. J., Manson, J. E., Malspeis, S., Willett, W. C., & Spiegelman, D. (2004). Sexual orientation, health risk factors, and physical functioning in the Nurses' Health Study II. Journal of women's health, 13(9), 1033-1047.Cochran et al., 2001, 2004

  • Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (2009). TIP 51: Substance abuse treatment: Addressing the specific needs of women.

  • Connolly, D. J., Davies, E., Lynskey, M., Maier, L. J., Ferris, J. A., Barratt, M. J., & Gilchrist, G. (2022). Differences in alcohol and other drug use and dependence between transgender and cisgender participants from the 2018 Global Drug Survey. LGBT health, 9(8), 534-542.

  • Cornish, J. L., & Prasad, A. A. (2021). Sex differences in substance use disorders: a neurobiological perspective. Frontiers in global women's health, 2, 778514.

  • Diamant, A. L., Wold, C., Spritzer, K., & Gelberg, L. (2000). Health behaviors, health status, and access to and use of health care: a population-based study of lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual women. Archives of f amily medicine, 9(10), 1043.

  • Flores-Bonilla, A., & Richardson, H. N. (2020). Sex differences in the neurobiology of alcohol use disorder. Alcohol research: current reviews, 40(2)

  • Frost, M. C., Blosnich, J. R., Lehavot, K., Chen, J. A., Rubinsky, A. D., Glass, J. E., & Williams,

  • E. C. (2021). Disparities in documented drug use disorders between transgender and cisgender US Veterans Health Administration patients. Journal of addiction medicine, 15(4), 334.

  • Giacometti, L. L., & Barker, J. M. (2020). Sex differences in the glutamate system: Implications for addiction. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 113, 157-168.

  • Hereth, J. E., & Durand, B. (2023). Incorporating transgender-affirmative practice models into substance use treatment and prevention. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 23(2), 152-160.

  • Hughes, T., Wilsnack, S., Martin, K., Matthews, A., & Johnson, T. (2021). Alcohol use among sexual minority women: Methods used and lessons learned in the 20-Year Chicago Health and Life Experiences of Women Study. International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research, 9(1), 30-42.

  • Hughto, J. M., Quinn, E. K., Dunbar, M. S., Rose, A. J., Shireman, T. I., & Jasuja, G. K. (2021). Prevalence and co-occurrence of alcohol, nicotine, and other substance use disorder diagnoses among US transgender and cisgender adults. JAMA network open, 4(2), e2036512-e2036512. Ives J. Gender differences in manifestation of diseases lead to poorer diagnosis and treatment in women. University of Colorado Ludeman Family Center for Women's Health Research. June 11, 2019

  • Kalin, N. H. Substance use disorders and addiction: mechanisms, trends, and treatment implications. 2020. American Journal of Psychiatry, 177(11), 1015-1018.

  • Klefsjö, U., Kantzer, A. K., Gillberg, C., & Billstedt, E. (2021). The road to diagnosis and treatment in girls and boys with ADHD–gender differences in the diagnostic process. Nordic journal of psychiatry, 75(4), 301-305.

  • Meadows, S. O., Collins, R. L., Schuler, M. S., Beckman, R. L., & Cefalu, M. (2023). The Women's Reproductive Health Survey (WRHS) of Active-Duty Service Members. Rand Health Quarterly, 10(2).

  • Meyer, J. P., Isaacs, K., El-Shahawy, O., Burlew, A. K., & Wechsberg, W. (2019). Research on women with substance use disorders: Reviewing progress and developing a research and implementation roadmap. Drug and alcohol dependence, 197, 158-163.

  • Redmond, M. L., Smith, S., & Collins, T. C. (2020). Exploring African‐American womens' experiences with substance use treatment: A review of the literature. Journal of community psychology, 48(2), 337-350.

  • Rehm, J., & Shield, K. D. (2019). Global burden of disease and the impact of mental and addictive disorders. Current psychiatry

  • Reisner, S. L., Pardo, S. T., Gamarel, K. E., Hughto, J. M. W., Pardee, D. J., & Keo-Meier, C. L. (2015). Substance use to cope with stigma in healthcare among US female-to-male trans masculine adults. LGBT health, 2(4), 324-332.

  • Rizzo, D., Mu, T., Cotroneo, S., & Arunogiri, S. (2022). Barriers to accessing addiction treatment for women at risk of homelessness. Frontiers in Global Women's Health, 3, 795532.Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA], 2009, p. 27; SAMHSA. (2013c). Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental health findings, NSDUH Series H-47.

  • Sarich, P., Canfell, K., Egger, S., Banks, E., Joshy, G., Grogan, P., & Weber, M. F. (2021). Alcohol consumption, drinking patterns and cancer incidence in an Australian cohort of 226,162 participants aged 45 years and over. British journal of cancer, 124(2), 513-523.

  • Sawyer, K. S., Oscar-Berman, M., Barthelemy, O. J., Papadimitriou, G. M., Harris, G. J., & Makris, N. (2017). Gender dimorphism of brain reward system volumes in alcoholism. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 263, 15-25.

  • Thande, N. K., Wang, M., Curlin, K., Dalvie, N., & Mazure, C. M. (2019). The influence of sex and gender on health: How much is being taught in medical school curricula?. Journal of Women's Health, 28(12), 1748-1754

  • Towers, E. B., Williams, I. L., Qillawala, E. I., Rissman, E. F., & Lynch, W. J. (2023). Sex/gender differences in the time-course for the development of substance use disorder: A focus on the telescoping effect. Pharmacological reviews, 75(2), 217-249. http://www.ustranssurvey.org/report/2015 Walton, C. C., Rice, S., Gao, C. X., Butterworth, M., Clements, M., & Purcell, R. (2021). Gender differences in mental health symptoms and risk factors in Australian elite athletes. BMJ open sport & exercise medicine, 7(1), e000984.

  • Zakiniaeiz, Y., & Potenza, M. N. (2018). Gender-related differences in addiction: A review of human studies. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 23, 171-175.

  • Zhang, S. M., Lee, I. M., Manson, J. E., Cook, N. R., Willett, W. C., & Buring, J. E. (2007). Alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in the Women's Health Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 165(6), 667-676.

CE Details
Introductory
General

TPN.health has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 7267. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. TPN.health is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

 

Course meets the qualifications for hours of continuing education credit for LPCCs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. TPN.health is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LPCCs. TPN.health maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content.

 

Trusted Provider Network, LLC is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0220.

This course has been approved by TPN.health, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #198061, TPN.health is responsible for all aspects of the programming. Counselor Skill Group: Legal, Ethical and Professional Development.

Trusted Provider Network is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Trusted Provider Network maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

TPN.health, #1766, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. TPN.health maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 03/31/2022 – 03/31/2025. Social workers completing this course receive 1.5 continuing education credits.

 

Course meets the qualifications for hours of continuing education credit for LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. TPN.health is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LCSWs. TPN.health maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content.

 

Trusted Provider Network, LLC is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0654.

Course meets the qualifications for hours of continuing education credit for LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. TPN.health is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs. TPN.health maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content.

 

Trusted Provider Network, LLC is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists #MFT-0097.

CE Policy
Agenda
  • Waiting Room Opens
  • Workshop Begins
  • Workshop Ends
Note: Time designated for waiting room, breaks cannot be counted toward CE credit.
This course is fiscally sponsored by Lakeview Health. There may be potential biases or conflicts of interest inherent to this relationship, and it must be disclosed to participants. These conflicts of interest have no bearing on the course content and have been resolved.
Lantie Elisabeth Jorandby, MD

Dr. Lantie Jorandby, Chief Medical Officer at Lakeview Health in Jacksonville, FL, has dedicated her professional life to treating patients for mental illness and addiction. She is a nationally-recognized expert in the field and is triple board certified in general psychiatry, addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine.

Dr. Jorandby graduated with honors from Vanderbilt University with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Neuroscience. She attended medical school and completed her residency at the University of Florida. For seven years, Dr. Jorandby worked as a staff psychiatrist in the Veterans Administration and served as Mental Health Supervisor at the Veterans Administration Outpatient Clinic in Viera, Florida, the third largest Outpatient VA clinic in the country.

After completing her Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship at Yale University, Dr. Jorandby became Medical Director for the dual diagnosis unit at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts. She also served as faculty at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry. Prior to joining Lakeview Health, she worked in an integrative medicine and psychiatry practice in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Jorandby is a frequently sought speaker on the topic of mental health disorders, including eating disorders and co-occurring disorders with addiction, and a regular contributor to Psychology Today. She is passionate about encouraging patients to seek treatment and recovery for mental health, eating disorders and addiction.

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